Garden Beauty

5 Fabulous Cut Flowers for Your Garden + Book Giveaway

flower book on table with flowers

Last year, when my blog was nominated by Better Homes and Gardens as one of the Top 10 Garden Blogs of 2016, I found myself in the company of many amazing bloggers. I love expanding my virtual gardening community, so after learning about the nomination I emailed the other nominees to congratulate them and introduce myself.

I quickly learned that Erin, the owner of Floret Flowers, was kind and generous when she asked for my address to mail me a little care package of flower seeds to try in my garden.

I’ve been following her business journey ever since and am continually inspired by the gorgeous photos on her website and Instagram. Her photos of the dahlia harvest at her farm last fall convinced me that I must order dahlias for my garden this season. And I did – from her seed company!

Floret recently released a new book, Floret Farm’s Cut Flower Garden: Grow, Harvest, and Arrange Stunning Seasonal BloomsLast Friday I treated myself to an afternoon at my local coffee with the book and all of my flower seeds for the season. I happily read through the whole thing and planned out how I’m going to incorporate more flowers into my garden this year.

Vote for Your Favorite Photos of the Season!

Colorful vegetable garden harvest

Our vegetable gardens can feed not only our bodies, but our souls, too. There’s nothing quite like the feeling of walking out to your garden right before dinner to harvest the ingredients that will be featured on your plate that very evening. Feeding our families delicious food is a big part of the gardening experience.

But, what about the more intangible benefits of gardening? If we let them, they can be so much more than a place to grow our own food. Our gardens can also serve a bigger purpose of feeding our spiritual, emotional, physical, artistic and creative selves. They can be places where we find a beauty that touches us on a deeper level and sparks a feeling of joy that can only be found through nature.

How to Grow a Colorful Vegetable Garden

colorful vegetable harvest

If you had to pick a favorite time in your vegetable garden judging by aesthetics alone, which would it be? Spring, summer, fall (and winter if you’re one of the lucky ones) each have their own color palette. The colors of early spring are gentle and fresh –  the tender greens of newly emerging seedlings, the chartreuse of the trees pushing out their first leaves, and the soft whites, pinks and yellows of the early flowers.

Summer is when the color party really gets started. Those muted tones of spring flowers give way to the stronger purples, yellows, red and oranges of summer. Your vegetable plants start to put on exponential growth and become a deeper green. The first colorful fruits and vegetables can be seen peeking through the plants.

Fall brings the slanting light that gently caresses the vegetables and keeps them looking their best for the camera, the riot of color from annuals tumbling over themselves, and the harvests. Oh, the harvests! There’s every color imaginable in the baskets and bowls that overflow your kitchen counters.

Fall is my favorite time in my garden. The colors pull me in and beckon me to stay awhile with my camera. I open the living room curtains every morning so I can get a full view of my garden in all its glory. It’s with my gorgeous fall garden that I can finally pronounce the season a success!

I love bright colors, and fall is the season when they’re on display in all of their striking combinations and happy accidents. The flowers and vegetables are shouting from the garden, “Look at me!  See how beautiful I am!”

That’s why this is the perfect time for a garden tour focusing on the rainbow of colors that is the fall vegetable garden.

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megan@creativevegetablegardener.com
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